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Humility In The Workplace

Humility is to be equal to others; not above or below them. Humility is also to be compassionate, patient, calm and to recognize that you are a part of the force that created all things. Humble people may be more grounded in their lives than others.
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Humility is to be equal to others; not above or below them. Humility is also to be compassionate, patient, calm and to recognize that you are a part of the force that created all things.

Humble people may be more grounded in their lives than others. To be humble means to have a modest estimate of our own importance; to feel equal to others, not above or better than. Ego does not drive a humble person, because they are not motivated to impress or dominate others. Being humble gives us freedom from preoccupation with ourselves, because the need to maintain an inflated self-image is a burden that steals our creative energy, which could be put to better use.

Here are some examples of humility in the workplace:

-- Being able to accurately assess yourself, including your strengths and weaknesses
-- Remaining open to new information or ideas, even if they contradict your previous opinions
-- Balancing your own needs with service to others
-- Recognizing the contributions of others toward your successes
-- Being instinctively aware of your self-worth, to avoid reminding everyone about it constantly
-- Being able to put your ego aside and give your best without expecting recognition

It is inspiring to work with humble people, and especially a humble leader. We use a figure of speech, "on a high horse", when referring to an arrogant, superior person, and often suggest they "get off their high horse". Accomplishing this means being humble, and it has great benefits:

-- You will no longer waste time and energy contradicting other people
-- Conversations will be more pleasant for you when you remain open to what others have to say
-- People are more likely to hear your opinion when they think of you as "down to earth" rather than egotistical

A key to success is combining humility and determination. For instance, we can be thankful for experiences that knock us off our high horses, because sometimes we need to be grounded—down to earth—in order to relate to others better. What seems like a blow to the ego can serve as a lesson in humility, resulting in personal and professional expansion. Determination, then, is the motivation to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, learn the lesson, get back on the horse, and ride forward—not above others, not below, but together among people supporting each other.

To learn more about humility, study the biographies of Benjamin Franklin or Mother Theresa. You can find exemplars of humility in your own community, but you'll have to look hard, as humble people often aren't out to prove themselves to others.

I remain, humbly yours,

Penny

*Author Intentions –I write these articles for you. Look in the mirror, and accept your need for change, rather than finding these faults in others. You will experience a far greater result if you take initiative upon yourself. Feel free to share with others, and have them realize their own need for change.

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About the Author: Penny Tremblay

Serving Northern Ontario, professional development, training, coaching and keynote speaking engagements.
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