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Honesty...

Honesty Is Such A Lonely Word... In the dictionary, honesty is defined as truthfulness and fairness, not cheating and stealing, yet in the workplace honesty does not just concern lying, stealing or cheating.
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Honesty Is Such A Lonely Word...

In the dictionary, honesty is defined as truthfulness and fairness, not cheating and stealing, yet in the workplace honesty does not just concern lying, stealing or cheating. Honesty in the workplace is also about righteousness, and doing the right things such as engaging in open communication, saying what needs to be said, and being straightforward and assertive.

Workplace relations are strengthened by trust. Honesty builds and maintains trust, while dishonesty diminishes trust. Your customers will choose your business because they trust you. Your employees and corporate climate will benefit within a trusting environment.

Here are four examples of situations that require honesty and righteousness:

Confronting a festering issue with a co-worker is important for the efficiency of a team, yet requires bravery to face the situation, and a constructive message to improve circumstances.

Sharing the good details as well as the bad during a sales pitch is important in helping the customer to make an informed choice, which often results in greater trust in their decision to purchase your product.

Speaking up in disagreement of a proposal or situation, rather than saying nothing.

Settling an interpersonal conflict with the person in question, rather than discussing it with others.



In situations like these, taking action involves going beyond the usual definition of honesty. By being true to yourself, you can solve many common problems at work and in your personal life. There is much to be gained from being honest: freedom in our minds, knowing that we have done the right thing for the good of all involved; peace in our hearts, as we are acting with integrity and our best work ethic; and trust from our colleagues, customers, and most importantly ourselves, that we are worthy of greatness.

Why aren't people more honest in the workplace? It's not always bad motive that drives dishonest behaviour, but more commonly, bad judgement and poor communication that drive the lack of honesty that is required for a team to function properly.

Companies want their staff to be honest, but employees aren't always provided the training, skills, and tools needed to use open communication. When people are not up-front and honest, it is often because they are afraid of criticism, retaliation, or upsetting someone.

To be honest with your words and actions in the workplace may seem like a daunting task at times, yet the benefits of feeling at peace with yourself, and knowing that you've done your personal best is well worth the effort.

Could you be more honest with yourself in 2011?

Penny

"Truth never damages a cause that is just" - Mahatma Ghandi

"I would rather offend with the truth, than please with adulation" - Seneca



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About the Author: Penny Tremblay

Serving Northern Ontario, professional development, training, coaching and keynote speaking engagements.
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