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North Bay Walk for Muscular Dystrophy raises over $14,000

'My favourite part about the Walk is that we all come together to turn something that affects our lives so negatively at times and turn it into something that will positively affect the lives of many'
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The North Bay Walk for Muscular Dystrophy got underway Saturday morning with about 100 participants supporting thousands of people who are living with a neuromuscular disorder in Canada. The Walk raised over  $14,000 to go towards various programs including the funding of equipment, assistive living devices, and support services for clients with neuromuscular diseases.  

Walk Ambassador Meagan Wills hosted the eighth annual event and cut the ribbon to officially start the walk.

"I was diagnosed at the age of 14 and first got involved in the walk for Muscular Dystrophy so I could be a part of a community of people who are all going through the same thing and to help shine some light on a cause that is not spoken about often enough," said Wills. 

"My favourite part about the Walk is that we all come together to turn something that affects our lives so negatively at times and turn it into something that will positively affect the lives of many. For me, it is to let others living with muscular dystrophy know that they don’t have to deal with it alone, that there is a community of people and together we are a lot stronger. 

"I’m walking for not only myself but for my children so that if one day they are diagnosed with muscular dystrophy they will know they are not alone but a part of a community of people who all have the same goals and have lived with similar struggles in life," added Wills. 

Muscular dystrophy is a group of progressive muscle disorders that weaken the muscles that control body movement. These effects can be devastating and over time, many people with neuromuscular disorders are unable to walk, speak or ultimately breathe. For some, the disorder is fatal.

“Not only does the Walk for Muscular Dystrophy raise funds to deliver critical services to our clients, it also brings a wide variety of people together in support of those affected by a neuromuscular disorder,” said John Britton, Muscular Dystrophy Canada Ontario Executive Director. 

Muscular Dystrophy Canada receives almost no government funding and relies on community events and the generosity of its donors.  Proceeds from the event support various programs including funding equipment, assistive living devices, support services and fund research to one day find a cure. 

 



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Jeff Turl

About the Author: Jeff Turl

Jeff is a veteran of the news biz. He's spent a lengthy career in TV, radio, print and online, covering both news and sports. He enjoys free time riding motorcycles and spoiling grandchildren.
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