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WHO KNEW?

After years of waiting to access the 1911 census for the United Kingdom the wait is over. A newly found cousin of mine from New Zealand sent me an email detailing the family on the 1911 census in Dover.
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After years of waiting to access the 1911 census for the United Kingdom the wait is over. A newly found cousin of mine from New Zealand sent me an email detailing the family on the 1911 census in Dover. I thought this was great, but wondered where she had retrieved such information. For some reason access to information in New Zealand seems to be ahead of us; not sure if that is because their winter is the opposite of ours or what, but I am not going to look a gift horse in the mouth. I promptly emailed her and asked her where she got her 1911 information and she emailed back with the following website address http://www.1911census.co.uk/. Now I am not too sure how long we have had access but I am just glad this has been brought to my attention; partial release was done sometime in 2009. Full release will be done in 2012.

This website is connected to another website findmypast.com and both are pay per view sites, but the initial searches for your ancestors are free. If you know enough about the whereabouts of your relatives you can piece together a family in no time at all. The 1911 census is a document that lists every household, including all individuals staying in the house on the night of Sunday 2 April 1911. Some interesting details you can learn from this census are the names and ages of the individuals, their relationship to the head of household, their occupation and their place of birth. Other questions asked on this census were to do with fertility, including number of years a woman had been married and how many children she had living and dead. Also be aware of the birthplace and occupation codes represented by a number. Be sure to check this out so you have all the information possible.

There are many reasons why you may not find your ancestor during your search of this website. The transcription may have been incorrect due to poor quality of the document including smudging, water damage or poor calligraphy. The census might have been destroyed through fire or flooding. The individual may not have been at a particular household when the census was taken; in that case look elsewhere. People could have lied about their age or gave nicknames instead of their given names. The suffragette movement encouraged woman to protest the census that night, thus many woman refused to be listed on the census or made sure they were not around to be enumerated that night; they were trying to force the government to give women the right to vote. Some husbands refused to list the females in their household, how sad.

Now the search at this website will only reveal some of the mentioned information and if you want to look at the scanned image of the original document you will have to buy so many credits; a transcription of the original document will cost you less credits. This website gives you an example of the original document verses the transcription, so you will not be surprised when you request one or the other. Further they are a secure website when you go to make payment, which is very important when shopping on line. Look for the s in front of the URL during payment, as well as the picture of a closed lock on your tool bar. Cost of a document can vary depending on the package you buy and seems to be around $5.00 - $7.00 Canadian. Not bad considering the purchase of other types of documents can be double that price or even more. Finally, do not forget to review the website for hints on searching for your ancestors, like how to use wildcard searches. Best of luck finding your ancestor at this new genealogical treasure of a website.

Happy Hunting!!

“MAY ALL YOUR GENEALOGICAL DREAMS COME TRUE!!!”

Tammy Tipler-Priolo BASc, PLCGS
The Ancestor Investigator is also the Ancestor Whisperer.