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Angel Light ascends to God Light. Part One. BayToday.ca exclusive

Wednesday, May 11, 2005   by: Baytoday.caTroy Hurtubise looks over the God Light before a demonstration. Photo by Bill Tremblay, Special to BayToday.ca.

Troy Hurtubise admits he can’t program a VCR.

But the North Bay inventor said he has reconfigured his see-through-walls Angel Light and used it to reverse Parkinson’s disease symptoms in one patient, shrink and eliminate breast cysts in another, reduce the size of cancer tumours in lab mice, regenerate plant growth, and hasten seed germination.

Open to anybody
Hurtubise said the device—created with major contributions from a German physicist, and the help of an electronics engineer and an electrician—has produced such “staggeringly positive” results, he will open his lab to any scientist or researcher in the world who wants to come to North Bay to investigate the God Light.

“You can use my lab for as long as you want to conduct any experiment that you want, all I ask for is a copy of your report when it’s done, whether it’s negative or positive,” Hurtubise said, after giving BayToday.ca an exclusive demonstration of the God Light.

“My lab is open to anybody of credibility in the scientific world, who works on, say, Parkinson’s, AIDS, MS, or Alzheimer’s. The proof is in the pudding, and I will turn the machine on and you will see results that will amaze you.”

In front of the world
Hurtubise has also offered $20,000 to anyone who can prove God Light or any other of his innovations are fraudulent or don’t work.

“I’m saying to any critic out there to put your money where your mouth is. You come to my lab with any expert you want. You prove my fire paste, my LIMBIC and my Godlight to be fraudulent, and I will give you $20,000 cash, and openly I will be a fraud in front of the world,” Hurtubise said.

“But if you can’t prove them to be fraudulent, which you can’t, you’re going to give me 20 grand. Let’s see where your mouth is now.”

Revolutionize physics
One scientist interviewed by BayToday.ca said Hurtubise had “rewritten” the laws of physics with the God Light.

William Rieken, a PhD candidate at the Chihara Laboratory, at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), in Osaka, Japan, has co-invented the XB-2, an unmanned aerial vehicle developed for search and rescue missions.

Rieken, a computer scientist with a background in particle physics, was in North Bay Tuesday because he is considering using some Hurtubise-invented materials for the XB-2 and wanted to take back samples for further analyses.

Hurtubise also gave him a demonstration of the God Light.

“I think this is going to revolutionize physics and change the understanding of the concepts of science,” Rieken said.

“What Troy’s doing can’t be done, according to the current theories and models that we have. I know a lot of physicists in Japan who would love to get their hands on this machine.”

An idiot
Hurtubise and the German physicist, who requested anonymity, worked together on the project using a Web cam.

“First he’s got engineers doing schematics, and I said ‘buddy don’t you get it that I am an idiot with electronics,’ so he would show me what to do using the Web cam,” Hurtubise said.

The engineer and the electrician provided the expertise Hurtubise didn’t have, and some of the more specialized parts of the God Light were manufactured at various machine shops in North Bay.

The 26-foot device utilizes 67 high-end optical lenses and five different gases, while producing 80,000 lux of full-spectrum light.

Two of the nine run on pure oxygen, and four produce electromagnetic radiation in a closed chamber, Hurtubise said.

Beyond realistic expectations
When the God Light was completed, the physicist, sensing a possible use for it, put Hurtubise in touch with a Toronto cancer researcher.

Hurtubise said he knew he was onto something after two cancerous lab mice were exposed to the device.

The findings, Hurtubise said, quoting from the researcher’s notes, were “beyond realistic expectations.”

Beyond realistic expectations
One mouse, Specimen C-12, had a stomach tumour, while the other, Specimen H-27, had a brain tumour.

C-12 had been exposed to the God Light for 20 minutes and seven seconds, and H-27 for 18 minutes and 33 seconds.

The researcher, who did not reveal his name, Hurtubise said, then extracted small skin samples from each mouse for analyses.

“C-12 had a 27-per cent reduction in the tumour, the researcher told me,” Hurtubise said, adding the mouse had had prior radiation therapy.

H-27, which had had no prior therapy, Hurtubise said, exhibited a 12-per cent reduction in its tumour.

“And there was no further advancement of cancer to healthy tissue, or adverse side effects detected within a 56-hour observation period,” Hurtubise said, again quoting the researcher.

“Though test results are in their infancy with regards to strict scientific protocol, the preliminary findings are beyond realistic expectations,” the researcher had written.

It's ready
Hurtubise then went from mice to plants.

He took two plants, and cut the stalks below the flowers of each plant.

One cut plant was placed under the God Light and the other left alone as a control.

“And literally in three hours, bang, growth where no growth’s supposed to me,” Hurtubise said, while pointing to new flower heads on the plant.

Colorado blue spruce tree seeds Hurtubise exposed to the God Light germinated within one week, he added.

“Those normally take three months to germinate, and mine were germinated in seven days.”

It was at that point Hurtubise decided to flout scientific protocol and test the God Light on people.

How did Troy's human testing turn out? Find out Thursday only on BayToday.ca. Part two of this story will also include exclusive photographs of the God Light in action.

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